FAQs

about food waste disposal (5)

Stringy things like corn husks, celery stalks, tea bag strings have a tenancy to "windup" around the beaters in

the disposal and can stop the waste disposal from working.

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For common every day food odors from a disposal, just put in some ice cubes with lemon, lime or orange peels. Then

keep the waste disposal working for 30 seconds. so it will smells great!

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You’ll know your disposal is jammed or clogged when the motor hums but the disposal doesn’t grind, is overly noisy, or runs and then stops before you turn it off.
The problem is often a piece of bone, a fruit pit, or the like stuck between an impeller blade and the drain hole. Don’t continue to run the disposal when it’s jammed as this can burn out the motor.
Be sure to turn off the electrical circuit that powers the garbage disposal before making any repairs.
To clear a jammed disposal:
1.Unplug the unit and check the instructions in your owner’s manual.
2.Under the sink, look at the bottom of the disposal for a hex-shaped hole. If you see one, look for a hex wrench that fits the hole (it’s often attached to the disposal). Fit the hex wrench into the hole, and force it back and forth in both directions to free the impellers. (Note: Some models have a reversing switch that accomplishes the same action.)
3.If your disposal doesn’t have a hex hole or you can’t find a hex wrench, put a short broom stick into the disposal (with the switch turned off!), force it down against one of the blades, and try to rotate the impeller.
4.If something has been put in the disposal that shouldn’t have—such as metal, rubber, glass, or fibrous food waste such as artichoke leaves or banana peels—use tongs or pliers to pull the material out. Never use your hand.

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When water stands in the sink, it means the drain is clogged either in the disposal or further down the drain line. This isn’t a garbage disposal problem but rather a plumbing problem

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If you notice leaks below the garbage disposal, find out the source of the leak, and tighten the offending connection. If necessary, replace the drain gasket or the unit’s mounting screws.If the unit is unreasonably noisy, check that something hasn’t dropped into the waste disposer unit that shouldn’t have. If all is clear, you may need to replace the blade, impeller, or motor; this should be done by a professional staff. Because these types of repairs can be costly, it’s often cheaper, faster, and wiser to replace the entire unit.

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